Location:

Nottinghamshire, UK

Status:

RIBA Stage 2

Scale:

6-bedroom house

Constraints:

Open countryside, NPPF,

Paragraph 79 House

River View

 

RIVER PASSIVHAUS

RIVER PASSIVHAUS

 

 

The ‘countryside house’ clause – then PPG 7, later PPS7 – is now enshrined in paragraph 55 of the National Planning Policy Framework (introduced in March 2012) and remains one of the few items of planning law that explicitly demands exceptional architectural standards for building new homes in the open countryside. ​

 

NPPF Planning policy states such a design should:

 

1. Be truly outstanding or innovative, helping to raise standards of design more generally in rural areas;

 

2. Reflect the highest standards in architecture;

 

3. Significantly enhance its immediate setting; and

 

4. Be sensitive to the defining characteristics of the local area

...full text

 

The ‘countryside house’ clause – then PPG 7, later PPS7 – is now enshrined in paragraph 55 of the National Planning Policy Framework (introduced in March 2012) and remains one of the few items of planning law that explicitly demands exceptional architectural standards for building new homes in the open countryside.

 

NPPF Planning policy states such a design should:

 

Be truly outstanding or innovative, helping to raise standards of design more generally in rural areas;

Reflect the highest standards in architecture;

Significantly enhance its immediate setting; and

Be sensitive to the defining characteristics of the local area

 

Rural Nottinghamshire is stooped in history and legend, most notably through the tales of Robin Hood and his band of ‘merry men’ who lived deep in Sherwood Forest. River View is located just south of Sherwood Forest and takes its inspiration from beautiful woodland clearings to form a man-made glade with enclosed central courtyard - a contemporary forest sanctuary. The dwelling is sited in a clearing at the top of the woodland escarpment and positioned to enjoy distant views over the River Trent valley as well as take advantage of solar opportunities for day lighting and renewables.

The design follows a holistic approach, evolved from a number of local reference points – the circular form referencing the woodland glade in which it is situated creates a contemporary curved plan, that both tracks the sun path and creates a sense of enclosure and security in the central courtyard. The proposed building employs a lattice of Corten steel screens to the exterior that will complement the hues of the surrounding trees and vegetation, especially during the autumnal months, whilst the green roof will help the building blend into its woodland setting.

 

The environmentally sensitive house is respectful to its rural setting and preserves the public footpath, bridleways, field boundaries and topography of the site. The building is nestled into the landscape and appears to emerge from the sloped terrain. The dwelling appears to tread lightly in the surrounding vegetation as soft landscaping and planting around the base of the dwelling utilises the landscape to embed and break down the form of the building where it meets the ground.

 

This innovative dwelling will act as a low-energy exemplar in the area, incorporating a combination of best practice, highly energy efficient design combined with a significant amount of renewable energy technology. The ambition is to raise the standards for well-designed low energy architecture locally together with an exemplary standard of domestic-scale renewable energy production.

The ‘countryside house’ clause – then PPG 7, later PPS7 – is now enshrined in paragraph 55 of the National Planning Policy Framework (introduced in March 2012) and remains one of the few items of planning law that explicitly demands exceptional architectural standards for building new homes in the open countryside.



NPPF Planning policy states such a design should:



1. Be truly outstanding or innovative, helping to raise standards of design more generally in rural areas;



2. Reflect the highest standards in architecture;



3. Significantly enhance its immediate setting; and be sensitive to the defining characteristics of the local area



Rural Nottinghamshire is stooped in history and legend, most notably through the tales of Robin Hood and his band of ‘merry men’ who lived deep in Sherwood Forest. River View is located just south of Sherwood Forest and takes its inspiration from beautiful woodland clearings to form a man-made glade with enclosed central courtyard - a contemporary forest sanctuary. The dwelling is sited in a clearing at the top of the woodland escarpment and positioned to enjoy distant views over the River Trent valley as well as take advantage of solar opportunities for day lighting and renewables.



The design follows a holistic approach, evolved from a number of local reference points – the circular form referencing the woodland glade in which it is situated creates a contemporary curved plan, that both tracks the sun path and creates a sense of enclosure and security in the central courtyard. The proposed building employs a lattice of Corten steel screens to the exterior that will complement the hues of the surrounding trees and vegetation, especially during the autumnal months, whilst the green roof will help the building blend into its woodland setting.



The environmentally sensitive house is respectful to its rural setting and preserves the public footpath, bridleways, field boundaries and topography of the site. The building is nestled into the landscape and appears to emerge from the sloped terrain. The dwelling appears to tread lightly in the surrounding vegetation as soft landscaping and planting around the base of the dwelling utilises the landscape to embed and break down the form of the building where it meets the ground.



This innovative dwelling will act as a low-energy exemplar in the area, incorporating a combination of best practice, highly energy efficient design combined with a significant amount of renewable energy technology. The ambition is to raise the standards for well-designed low energy architecture locally together with an exemplary standard of domestic-scale renewable energy production.

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