Location:

Hull, UK

Status:

Pre-planning

Scale:

c250 dwellings

Constraints:

Tidal and surface water flooding

 

 

Hull Resilient Community

LIVING WITH WATER

LIVING WITH WATER

...full text

 

90% of Hull sits under High Tide level and is the second most vulnerable city in the United Kingdom after London for flooding.

 

Embracing this vulnerability as an opportunity “LivingWithWater.co.uk” -  a  partnership comprising of the Environment Agency, Hull City Council, the East Riding of Yorkshire Council and Yorkshire Water are investing in Hull and East Riding to reduce flood risk.

 

In 2019, the RIBA published a report* outlining what the government needs to do to help create homes and communities that are resilient to flood damage. The report, “The value of flood-resilient architectural design”, stresses that the UK can no longer base its approach to managing flood risk on simply keeping the water out.

 

Embracing these recommendations Living with Water advertised an international competition to rejuvenate Hull waterfront and Newcastle-based practice Harper Perry Architects were selected as the winner. Baca will support Harper Perry Architects to deliver this wonderful scheme.

 

Successful waterfronts provide more than just landmark buildings. They create  neighbourhoods with the right scale and proportion of public space. These neighbourhoods have a successful mix of uses and work with water to locate the most vulnerable of uses in the lowest flood risk areas.

 

Hull’s “Water Line” creates a vibrant urban development that is not cut off either visually and physically from the waterfront by a defensive sea wall.  Flood protection measures also contribute environmental and social benefits within the scheme and enhance the wider waterfront offer. At the heart of the proposals is an ambition to preserve the continuity of daily life, even during extreme flood events.

 

The Water Line is a landscape driven proposal that provides a layered approach of flood mitigation that “makes space for water”, creating a generous urban realm, and providing parking and amenity onto which either low density or high-density development can be accommodated, depending on the sites’ specific needs as each one comes forward for development. Specifically it will enhance the Environment Agency’s Hull Frontage Flood Defence Improvements - a £42 million tidal flood defence scheme along the Humber within the City of Hull.

 

The concept is to create a floodproof development of homes that works with water rather than defending against it. The proposals provide high quality flood resilient family homes within communal gardens and an attractive landscape.

 

*RIBA POLICY NOTE: “The value of flood-resilient architectural design”, Baca Director, Richard Coutts and RIBA Fellow contributed to this report and many of the practices recommendations were included in the institutions white paper to Government.

 

To enable the UK to better harness these benefits, the RIBA has 5 recommendations for Government:

 

         1. Central and Local Government should work with built environment experts to improve infrastructure investment decision-making processes

         2. The DCLG should work with built environment experts, the Environment Agency and Defra to create “Licences for Innovation”

         3. The DCLG should introduce Building Regulations for flood resilience linked to Flood Zone Designations

         4. Flood-prone cities with housing shortages should explore designating ‘Bluebelt’ land for flood-resilient development

         5. Central and Local Government should ensure flood-resilient design is more proactively taken up by home and building owners exposed to flood risk

 

 

90% of Hull sits under High Tide level and is the second most vulnerable city in the United Kingdom after London for flooding.

 

Embracing this vulnerability as an opportunity “LivingWithWater.co.uk” -  a  partnership comprising of the Environment Agency, Hull City Council, the East Riding of Yorkshire Council and Yorkshire Water are investing in Hull and East Riding to reduce flood risk.

 

In 2019, the RIBA published a report* outlining what the government needs to do to help create homes and communities that are resilient to flood damage. The report, “The value of flood-resilient architectural design”, stresses that the UK can no longer base its approach to managing flood risk on simply keeping the water out.

 

 

90% of Hull sits under High Tide level and is the second most vulnerable city in the United Kingdom after London for flooding.



Embracing this vulnerability as an opportunity “LivingWithWater.co.uk” - a partnership comprising of the Environment Agency, Hull City Council, the East Riding of Yorkshire Council and Yorkshire Water are investing in Hull and East Riding to reduce flood risk.



In 2019, the RIBA published a report* outlining what the government needs to do to help create homes and communities that are resilient to flood damage. The report, “The value of flood-resilient architectural design”, stresses that the UK can no longer base its approach to managing flood risk on simply keeping the water out.



Embracing these recommendations Living with Water advertised an international competition to rejuvenate Hull waterfront and Newcastle-based practice Harper Perry Architects were selected as the winner. Baca will support Harper Perry Architects to deliver this wonderful scheme.



Successful waterfronts provide more than just landmark buildings. They create neighbourhoods with the right scale and proportion of public space. These neighbourhoods have a successful mix of uses and work with water to locate the most vulnerable of uses in the lowest flood risk areas.



Hull’s “Water Line” creates a vibrant urban development that is not cut off either visually and physically from the waterfront by a defensive sea wall. Flood protection measures also contribute environmental and social benefits within the scheme and enhance the wider waterfront offer. At the heart of the proposals is an ambition to preserve the continuity of daily life, even during extreme flood events.



The Water Line is a landscape driven proposal that provides a layered approach of flood mitigation that “makes space for water”, creating a generous urban realm, and providing parking and amenity onto which either low density or high-density development can be accommodated, depending on the sites’ specific needs as each one comes forward for development. Specifically it will enhance the Environment Agency’s Hull Frontage Flood Defence Improvements - a £42 million tidal flood defence scheme along the Humber within the City of Hull.



The concept is to create a floodproof development of homes that works with water rather than defending against it. The proposals provide high quality flood resilient family homes within communal gardens and an attractive landscape.



*RIBA POLICY NOTE: “The value of flood-resilient architectural design”, Baca Director, Richard Coutts and RIBA Fellow contributed to this report and many of the practices recommendations were included in the institutions white paper to Government.



To enable the UK to better harness these benefits, the RIBA has 5 recommendations for Government:



1. Central and Local Government should work with built environment experts to improve infrastructure investment decision-making processes

2. The DCLG should work with built environment experts, the Environment Agency and Defra to create ‘Licences for Innovations’

3. The DCLG should introduce Building Regulations for flood resilience linked to Flood Zone Designations

4. Flood-prone cities with housing shortages should explore designating ‘Bluebelt’ land for flood resilient development

5. Central and Local Government should ensure flood-resilient design is more proactively taken up by home and building owners exposed to flood risk

...full text

 

Baca Architects has designed a cocoa pod-shaped treehouse for an eco hotel located on a secluded Panama island, which is accessible only by boat. The practice was asked to design the treehouse as well as a larger residence for the Bíku Treehouse Retreat on the Bocas del Toro archipelago.

 

The chain of islands in the Caribbean Sea are known for their scenic natural parks, made up from forests and mangroves that provide a habitat for hundreds of species. The treehouse’s design aims to take advantage of the idyllic setting through a broad panoramic opening at one side of its bulbous form, splitting it in two like a cocoa pod.

 

The fascination with treehouses around the world has inspired some of the most fascinating and unusual architectural creations. From a UFO to a Bird's Nest, or a 727 airplane to more modern cubist structures, resort developers are creating unique offerings for travelers.

Baca Architects has designed a cocoa pod-shaped treehouse for an upcoming eco-hotel located on a secluded Panama island, only accessible by boat far away from the crowds of tourists. The UK based designers were asked to design the treehouse as well as a larger residence for the on the Bocas del Toro archipelago.

 

The chain of islands in the Caribbean is known for their beautiful natural forests filled with mangroves and a verdant habitat for wildlife. The treehouse’s design will take advantage of the setting through a panoramic opening at one side of its rounded form, splitting it in two like a cocoa pod. The forms are inspired by cocoa pods and other seed structures found in the rainforests of Panama.

 

Baca Architects has designed a cocoa pod-shaped treehouse for an upcoming eco-hotel located on a secluded Panama island, only accessible by boat far away from the crowds of tourists. The UK based designers were asked to design the treehouse as well as a larger residence for the Bíku Treehouse Retreat on the Bocas del Toro archipelago.

 

The young owners are Ariel Stephenson and Zabrina Shield. Ariel is Panamanian, from Bocas del Toro and Zabrina is British. Ariel has lived outside of Panama since he was 17 and has been living in the UK for more than 15 years. He has worked in the hospitality industry for more than 20 years at some of the top hotels in London including The Soho, Covent and ACE Hotel. Zabrina is a nature and culture lover with a passion for Latin America.

 

Bamboo was picked as the primary material for the 270 square foot treehouse, due to abundance in Panama and to make use of local construction knowledge. To reduce the need for construction vehicles on site, parts of the structure will be prefabricated and assembled on the island. This also means the structure can be deconstructed without leaving permanent traces on the site. A spiral staircase wrapping the trunk of the tree, as well as the treehouse’s structure, will all be made from bamboo.

 

 

 

Baca Architects has designed a cocoa pod-shaped treehouse for an eco hotel located on a secluded Panama island, which is accessible only by boat. The practice was asked to design the treehouse as well as a larger residence for the Bíku Treehouse Retreat on the Bocas del Toro archipelago.

 

The chain of islands in the Caribbean Sea are known for their scenic natural parks, made up from forests and mangroves that provide a habitat for hundreds of species. The treehouse’s design aims to take advantage of the idyllic setting through a broad panoramic opening at one side of its bulbous form, splitting it in two like a cocoa pod.

 

 

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